Last edited by Taushura
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Vance Randolph collection found in the catalog.

Vance Randolph collection

Vance Randolph

Vance Randolph collection

by Vance Randolph

  • 30 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Children"s songs, English,
  • English Ballads,
  • Traditional medicine,
  • Social life and customs,
  • Dialects,
  • Tales,
  • Shape note singing,
  • Folk dance music,
  • Folk literature,
  • Fiddle tunes,
  • Games,
  • English language,
  • Folk music,
  • Singing games,
  • Correspondence,
  • Religious life and customs,
  • English Hymns,
  • Old-time music,
  • Storytelling,
  • Field recordings,
  • Folk festivals,
  • Local History,
  • Rites and ceremonies,
  • Superstition,
  • Ethnomusicological collections,
  • English Folk songs,
  • Folklore,
  • Folklorists,
  • Tall tales,
  • Material culture

  • About the Edition

    The Vance Randolph collection documents aspects of Ozark Mountains folklife and culture from 1941-1972. Randolph made field recordings of folksongs, speech, and photographs in the Ozarks from 1941-1943 for the Archive of American Folk Song, Library of Congress. Randolph donated his papers to the Archive in 1972 and the two accessions were combined. Recordings include instrumentals, unaccompanied and accompanied ballads, folk songs, popular songs, hymns, religious songs, fiddle tunes, and old-time music, performed on fiddle, banjo, mandolin, guitar, piano, and harmonica. Randolph accumulated an extensive number of newspaper clippings and topical files on a wide variety of subjects relating to the Ozarks, including local legends, folk beliefs, local history, traditional music, childrens" games, folk medicine, spiritual healing, jokes, riddles, place names, medicine shows, local dialect, folk festivals, sporting activities, local outlaw Belle Starr, and other local characters. Vance Randolph"s papers (1972 accession) comprise correspondence, fieldnotes, notes on family history, maps, articles, research notes, additional photographs, and other documents. Correspondents include Alan Lomax, Sidney Robertson Cowell, Henry Cowell, Louise Pound, Franz Boas, George Lyman Kittredge, Dorothy Scarborough, Thomas Hart Benton, Benjamin A. Botkin, Bertrand Bronson, Wayland D. Hand, Ruth Crawford Seeger, Richard Dorson, Herbert Halpert, Kenneth S. Goldstein, Gershon Legman, among others.

    Edition Notes

    Statementcollected by Vance Randolph
    ContributionsArchive of Folk Song (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination261 folders. 255 sound discs : 1 sound tape reel ; 164 photographic prints.
    Number of Pages261
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25169104M
    LC Control Number2003682276

    Buy Ozark Folksongs by Vance Randolph online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 4 editions - starting at $ Shop Range: $ - $   Vance Randolph has long been an undeniable presence on the American folklore scholarship scene. His Ozark corpus is "the best known single body of regional folklore in the United States," according to Richard Dorson, director of the Folklore Institute at Indiana University.5/5(5).

    Vance Randolph (Febru – November 1, ) was a folklorist who studied the folklore of the Ozarks in particular. He wrote a number of books on the Ozarks, as . This could have been a fun little book of bawdy Ozark folktales, assembled by Ozark folklorist Vance Randolph. But someone got hold of it and added comments ("annotations") at the end of each story, explaining the "true" origins of each story, and comparing it to other stories across the ages/5(4).

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Vance Randolph: An Ozark Life by Robert Cochran (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! Vance Randolph. Gershon Legman – Editor. page hardcover with jacket. New in shrink wrap The Vance Randolph collection is an archival book of record, published – like all such books – in the conviction that we can’t fully understand who we are in less Seller Rating: % positive.


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Vance Randolph collection by Vance Randolph Download PDF EPUB FB2

Vance Randolph was born in Pittsburg, Kansas, on Febru He was the oldest of three sons The Federal Census shows Vance with his family in Pittsburg, Kansas, at the age of eight. His father is listed as being an attorney and Vance is at school. The book deserves a place in any general collection of Americana and in all collections of folklore," U.S.

QUARTERLY BOOKLIST. "A veritable treasury of backwoods custom and belief [ a ] wealth of circumstantial detail and cultural background," Carl Withers, N.Y. TIMES. "Ozark Magic and Folklore" by Vance Randolph, published in Cited by: Click the book cover to go to the Vance Randolph Collection at the Axe library, Pittsburg State University, Kansas “The anecdotal tales included are sexy and scatalogical, sometimes clever, often just crude Randoplph’s faithful Vance Randolph collection book retains the local color, language, and delivery style of his informants, many of whom.

Vance Randolph was born in Pittsburg, Kansas, on Februand died in Fayetteville, Arkansas, on November 1, Vance Randolph was a folklorist who collected, annotated, and published different folklore genres for over a thirty-year-period in the Ozark region.

Vance Randolph was a folklorist whose wide-ranging studies in the traditional culture of the Ozarks made him famous with both academic and popular readers from the s to the present.

Vance Randolph was born on Februin Pittsburg, Kansas, to John Randolph, an attorney and Republican politician, and Theresa Gould, a public school teacher. Vance Randolph has 28 books on Goodreads with ratings. Vance Randolph’s most popular book is Pissing in the Snow and Other Ozark Vance Randolph collection book.

Vance Randolph has long been an undeniable presence on the American folklore scholarship scene. His Ozark corpus is "the best known single body of regional folklore in the United States," according to Richard Dorson, director of the Folklore Institute at Indiana University.

And Gershon Legman, the world's leading scholar of sexual and scatological humor, has called Randolph "the greatest and 4/5(3). Vance Randolph. Vance Randolph () was the foremost student of Ozark life and was elected a Fellow of the American Folklore Society in He published many popular and scholarly works, including many Little Blue Books and some juvenile fiction.

His major work is collected in the four-volume Ozark Folk Songs. Vance Randolph married. Vance Randolph (Febru – November 1, ) was a famous folklorist who studied the folklore of the Ozarks in particular.

He wrote a number of books on topics including the Ozarks, Little Blue Books, and juvenile fiction. Looking for books by Vance Randolph. See all books authored by Vance Randolph, including Pissing in the Snow and Other Ozark Folktales, and Ozark Magic and Folklore, and more on This collection of bawdy tales collected from the turn of the last century by Ozark scholar Vance Randolph will have you chuckling everywhere and laughing out right at the most inappropriate times.

Folk tales as funny as any Chaucer ever told!/5. Vance Randolph, circa Library of Congress, American Folklife Center- Vance Randolph Collection. Photograph.

Vance Randolph was a self-educated folklorist who made a living as a professional writer. Born in Pittsburg, Kansas, inhe was educated as a scientist.

He studied biology as an undergraduate and psychology as a graduate student at Clark University. Vance Randolph was the author and coauthor of several books, including "Ozark Superstitions, We Always Lie to Strangers, "and "Who Blowed Up the Church House.

" See less Vance Randolph book. Vance Randolph, the author of more than a dozen books on American folklore, including five collections of Ozark folktales and a four-volume collection of Ozark folksongs, lived in the Ozark mountains from until his death in   Vance Randolph was perfectly constituted for his role as the chronicler of Ozark folkways.

As a self-described “hack writer,” he was as much a figure of the margins as his chosen subjects, even as his essentially romantic identification with the region he first visited as the vacationing child of mainstream parents was encouraged by editors and tempered by his scientific training.

Credit | AFC Vance Randolph Collection, Library of Congress Vance Randolph He wrote magazine articles and scholarly and popular books, and he was always ready with an earthy remark gleaned from.

Vance Randolph Collection Vance Randolph's papers, photographs, and field recordings of Ozark folk music, ss. In the Archive of Folk Culture commissioned Vance Randolph to undertake a recording expedition in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas.

The book deserves a place in any general collection of Americana and in all collections of folklore," U.S. QUARTERLY BOOKLIST. "A veritable treasury of backwoods custom and belief [ a ] wealth of circumstantial detail and cultural background," Carl Withers, N.Y. : Dover Publications.

The Vance Randolph Collection had its beginnings in the early s with fieldwork conducted by the well-known "amateur" Ozark folklorist Vance Randolph. In FebruaryAlan Lomax, then head of the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress, wrote to Vance Randolph, asking if he would consider making field recordings in the Ozarks.

The first collaboration between Vance Randolph and Parler took place inwhen they worked together on Randolph's dialect book, Down in the Holler: A Gallery of Ozark Folk Speech. InDr. Parler published Arkansas Ballet Book, a compilation of Ozark ballads she had collected over the years.

Ozark Superstitions by VANCE RANDOLPH. Preface: For obvious reasons it is not practicable to credit every item in this collection to the individual from whom it was obtained, as I have done in Ozark Folksongs and some of my other books.

But for the sake of the record, I Author: Vance Randolph. Vance Randolph (Febru - November 1, ) was a famous folklorist who studied the folklore of the Ozarks in particular. He wrote a number of books on topics including the Ozarks, Little Blue Books, and juvenile fiction.

Randolph was born in Pittsburg, Kansas, the son of a lawyer and a teacher.C Randolph, Vance (), Ozark Folksongs, Collection, linear feet. RESTRICTED. This collection is available at. The State Historical .